Recently my husband and I were able to get away for a weekend and visit a lovely city in Georgia. We saw and learned about many historic sites and in doing so we came across an old stained glass windowed church that we found very intriguing. The church was open for tours but not on the weekend. We decided to attend Sunday morning service knowing it would be open then. Not only would we be able to see the church but we would have the opportunity to worship with a different congregation.

We arrived timely on Sunday morning after our half mile walk from our hotel. We had dressed for a day of sightseeing and walking the downtown area. Being we were in the south it was a warm day. However, our attire was not what people in the south wear when attending Sunday morning service. Although quite underdressed, we went in the church and we were welcomed by a lovely lady with a cheerful smile.

In reviewing the program we’d received upon entering the sanctuary it was  instantly clear this service would be a bit more formal than we were use to attending. Even so, I relished the thought of singing old hymns from the hymnal in the pew pocket in front of us.

The candles were light by the robed alter boys and a handbell was rung  by a young lady marking the beginning of the service. The clergy entered also dressed in robes. Then the service began.

The message that morning was very touching. The pastor was a woman and she shared a sweet story of how a 3 year old boy from the Sunday School program greeted her downtown one day when he saw her from across the street. With a big wave, he shouted, “Jesus! Jesus!” She went on to report that the parents were sure to have had a conversation with him that night clarifying that she only taught about Jesus, she was not in fact Jesus.

Undaunted the small child continued to attend Sunday School and the next time he saw her downtown, he indeed greeted her differently. He again waived robustly and but this time he shouted, “Ms Jesus!!! Ms Jesus!!!”

The pastor had definitely had an affect on this young boy and he was convinced she, in one way or another, was Jesus.

How many of us could cause confusion such as this in those around us by our actions?

If you or I were ever “charged” with being a Christ follower, would there be sufficient evidence to convict us?

Christ calls us to be His disciples. A disciple is defined as “a follower or student of a teacher, leader, or philosopher.”(1)

Jesus was most definitely is a teacher and leader when He walked the earth and He still is  today. His calls to us is to be known as His disciples. We read in John 13:35, “By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you love one another.”

…if you love one another.

Sounds so simple but it is so very hard. However, it’s what Christ has done for us. Romans 5:8 tells us, But God demonstrates His own love for us in this: While we were still sinners, Christ died for us.”

…if you love one  another.

It’s what Christ has done and does for us. It’s why we are known as His  disciples if we do the same. Loving one another starts at home, spreads to our workplace, to our schools, and goes with us everywhere we go.

My hope and prayer is that I can one day be convicted of being His disciple and others see me as Ms Jesus.

JW