5 Things That Make Me Nervous About Going On an International Mission Trip

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I’m getting ready to leave for the Dominican Republic on my first international mission trip. And actually my first mission trip in a really long time! 

I’m lucky, because I was asked to go and my trip is paid for generously by the staff budget, but I think if it was up to just me, I might let my fears get the best of me. I hope that by putting some of my fears on digital paper, that I can address them when I get back and maybe encourage you to take a step towards an international mission trip soon. 

A Foreign Language

I took three years of Spanish in high school, but that was over a decade ago. When I cracked open the Duolingo app that I downloaded eons ago to brush up on my “skills” I couldn’t even remember the word for blue. That’s my favorite color, I should know it! As a person who really values communication, it’s pretty terrifying to realize that everyone there is going to be speaking a language I can’t understand! 

Different Food and Water

And now a moment for TMI: my digestive system doesn’t like to travel. Like at all. My first solo mission trip as a high schooler I got elevation sickness and spent most of the trip hiding in the bathroom or my bunk horrified while VBS songs played in the background. A new cuisine and not-safe-for-drinking tap water makes my stomach hurt just thinking about it.

A Roommate

At our last pre-trip meeting I found out that we won’t learn our roommates until we arrive at our hotel. I think most people are probably like “Eh whatever!” but an introvert me likes to mentally prepare for what’s ahead. And now a mystery roommate is adding to my nerves. Don’t get me wrong, everyone going on the trip is awesome, and I’m really looking forward to getting to know them. I’m just generally awful at social interaction so I have to plan for it a lot. (Can I get an “Amen!” from the introverts hiding in the back?!)

Being Away From My Family

My husband and I have done a lot of long distance in our relationship in the past, so I know eight days away won’t even touch our relationship. But I’m just not sure how to explain to my toddler that I’m going to straight up abandon him for eight days, and daily calls not guaranteed. I find that little monster of guilt trying to slip up into my brain telling me that my son will be damaged forever if I leave.

Construction?!

Our team is serving with a couple of construction projects (cue laughing that I’m included). I’m a measly 5’1” lady with no muscle mass whatsoever, and I definitely don’t have any steel-toed boots in my wardrobe. Oh, and I’m totally out of shape right now! Good news, I do know the names of most tools though…just not in Spanish.

 

So these are the things that are making me nervous about our take-off on Saturday morning. When I get back I will write an update on God’s faithfulness in each of these areas, or maybe what He taught me as I faced them.

Here’s what I do know and what makes me excited to go!

I’m about to get to see God in totally different ways through very different people in different places. Any time I get to exit my worldview for a little while, I get to see a new facet of our very big God. This knowledge outweighs all of my fears, and has me counting down the days joyfully!

 

What are some of the things keeping you from taking your next big faith step? What’s in that step that could be worth more than hiding from your fears? What are you going to do next to walk towards God’s leading in your life?

#MyStory :: Barbara Martin - Serving in the Dominican Republic

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As Barbara Martin walked into the church building on Sunday, she was approached by her husband, Youth Pastor Chris Martin. He made her aware that the youth team traveling to the Dominican Republic was in need of a female chaperone.

She politely declined.

Barbara Martin did not want to go to the Dominican Republic (DR). She had no interest in the heat, the bugs, and the number of out-of-her-comfort-zone experiences there would potentially be on the trip.

She walked through the doors of the worship center and find her seat. Unbeknownst to her, God had called Pastor Drew to share about missions. During that time, Barbara felt the Lord tugging at her heart and knew that he was calling her to meet the need for a female chaperone. She walked out of the worship center that morning and into the commitment to go with the youth mission team to the DR.

The team spent their days in the Dominican Republic building a house for a woman and her children. Barbara said that children came from all over to witness the work being done. She and some of the team were able to love on the neighborhood children while work on the house was being completed. The children had dirty clothes and most had no shoes. The team handed out snacks to the children and to most, it was a precious gift.

Barbara saw dirty clothes, dirty children, mud walled houses, the heat from the stove where the fire was fed all day, more dirt, bugs, dirt that became mud when it rained, rain that did not cool the air but instead made it more oppressive, sewage that began to mingle with rivers of mud that flowed around and sometimes through the houses, more dirt, and more heat.

To be honest, little about the trip was enjoyable for Barbara.

However, God spoke very clearly to her about several things.

Sometimes, when we answer God’s call, like Barbara did to go on the trip, we believe that since we’re being obedient everything will be sunshine and roses. We think that beautiful blessings will flow out of God’s abundant love for us and it will be the best experience EVER because we are in God’s will for our lives! But, that’s not always the case – at least in terms of sunshine and roses. Paul, for example, was obedient to God’s call and he ended up in many uncomfortable places, not the least of which was prison.

But our work for God is not in vain.

Therefore, my dear brothers and sisters, stand firm. Let nothing move you.Always give yourselves fully to the work of the Lord, because you know that your labor in the Lord is not in vain.
(1 Corinthians 15:58)

God used Barbara’s experience in the DR to teach her about gratitude and dependence on Him.

Barbara witnessed the woman’s house being built and saw how she and others in the community were so dependent on God for EVERY THING. Barbara realized that in our blessed, American lives where so much comes easily, she is often not dependent on God for 30 minutes, much less dependent on him to provide everything and meet all her needs.

“The more (stuff) I have, the more I take for granted and the more I don’t depend on God,” Barbara said.

Barbara does not want to go back to the Dominican Republic. It was not a “fun” experience, but perhaps her obedience enabled the Lord to reach her on a level, out of her comfort zone, that she would not have allowed him to penetrate from the comfortable surroundings of the familiar.

In the dirt, heat, and discomfort of a foreign country, God showed her she should be doing much more at home. Barbara changed her perspective on missions and learned that she doesn’t have to go to the DR to make big changes for the kingdom of Christ. There is much to do in her community and in the lives of people she comes into contact with every day that will bring others closer to Him.

If you find yourself serving in a way that you don’t enjoy, ask God what he is teaching you. Then seek out somewhere you can serve that better meets your gifts. And remember that nothing we do for the Lord is in vain.

 

 

 

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